Remixed Video

“…Abandon notions of what is representational, what looks good, what makes sense and what works in any traditional or narrative sense. Instead, work playfully and intuitively.”

The aim being to enter into this assignment without any expectations bar deeply affecting imagery and audio to profoundly transform it from the original source material. The only idea I had in mind was to create a short video that, aesthetically, was cool to watch.

I began by converting the fan-uploaded, YouTube video to Selena Gomez’s song Good For You (featuring A$AP Rocky) (2015) to an MP3 file. Opening the track in Audacity, I increased the tempo in certain selections of the song by 19 per cent, increased the speed in sections by 46.102 per cent, the reverberation by 100 per cent, and utilised the fade-out and studio fade-out effects to alter the overall sound of the track significantly. As the original song did not have much of a drum beat to it, I sourced a Hip Hop influenced drum loop to compliment my remix. Layering and repeating this loop beneath my remixed track, I then utilised the cross fade-in and studio fade-out effects, lowered the volume of it and increased the speed of the entire beat by 14 per cent.

I had remixed the original song so that it was almost unrecognisable, but still presented an easy to work with sound influenced by pop and dance tracks.

The screenshot (above) depicts the soundwaves, effects and length of my remixed track that will accompany my video.
The screenshot (above) depicts the soundwaves, effects and length of my remixed track that will accompany my video.

In abandoning the notion of what is representational, what looks good and what makes sense and works in a traditional narrative sense, I had absolutely no starting point for what sort of imagery I wanted to source to remix. I eventually opted for videos that I had previously viewed and thought were eye catching enough to work together, including:

I arranged clips from each of these videos (that I had earlier converted into MP4 files) to fit the beat of my remixed track in Adobe After Effects.

This screenshot outlines the sequence in which the sourced videos were used.
This screenshot outlines the sequence in which the sourced videos were used.

For each individual clip, as I replayed their arrangement to my remixed track, I added an effect to distort the original videos so that they could be viewed as something new. The effects I utilised included:

  • Colour correcting and black and white filters;
  • Smear, ripple pulse, liquidation and echo;
  • Synthetic aperture and block dissolve;
  • The overlay of videos and split screens;
  • Time warp, displacement and reverse;
  • Camera lense blur; and
  • Vertical flips and the centre in view function.

I list these effects here, because in abandoning the traditional characteristics of video editing, I also abandoned thinking about what it was that I was doing to each clip. I did not restrict myself to the aspects of editing that I was used to. It was a methodology of using and adding and deleting effects until I found what worked best for my remixed video.

Adobe After Effects permits the user to view a composition chart of the imagery, effects and audio used to create the overall video. The screenshot (above) encapsulates the composition of my video.
Adobe After Effects permits the user to view a composition chart of the imagery, effects and audio used to create the overall video. The screenshot (above) encapsulates the composition of my video.

Whilst I could not affect all of the videos significantly enough to distort the original imagery, by my own standards, I was able to recreate and remix it to redefine it. Without much of a purpose, I believe I successfully achieved my aim to produce a short video that, aesthetically, looked cool. The clips theoretically serve no purpose together; however, it is what the audience can read into them that gives them meaning and each interpretation may be different.

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